Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Three New Species of the Metaphor

The writing for this endeavor partly grew out as an intuitive response to thought and read texts. The species of the Metaphor that I want rein the horse on are three. They are:

a) Transformed Metaphor

b) Implied Metaphor

c) Analogical Metaphor

-

a) Transformed Metaphor

Transformed metaphor occurs when a literary allusion is used as figure of speech. This occurs when its context changes but the semantic sense is retained.

For eg., There is a sword of a Damocles scenario for peace in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Here the Sword of Damocles comes from Greek referring to arrogant and belligerent courtier who was seated under a sword hanging by a single thread by his King Dionysus to show him how precarious peace was. The allusion: 'Sword of Damocles' works as metaphor of transformation replacing and substituting threatening as well as transforming the allusion. Another example is: The housing bubble occurred due to foolish investments on houses built on sand. Here 'built on sand' is an allusion from the parable of the wise builder. Use of allusions produce the effect of a transformed metaphor in literature.

b) Implied Metaphor

An implied metaphor is on where substitutions of terms which become implied to one entity. For eg. in John1:1: "In the beginning was the Word. The Word was with God. The Word was God." Here, WORD becomes an implied metaphor referring to God through the process of metaphoric substitution.

c) Analogical Metaphor

An analogical metaphor is the one where the metaphor works as a substitute through the process of analogy. Here again I refer to Christ's words as is spoken/written in the Parable related to the Kingdom of God. What is the Kingdom of God. Christ says: 'The Kingdom of God is akin to a good householder who brings out things both old and new." The Kingdom of God is analogized with good householder and hence the Kingdom of God as good householder works as an analogical metaphor.